ROAD HAMMERS’ BELLAMY PLANS TO ROCK IT OUT

BY KELLY-ANNE RIESS, THE LEADER-POST JUNE 30, 2010

Clayton Bellamy

(Tonight)

The Pump Roadhouse

Clayton Bellamy used to be a fighter who liked to party.

Bellamy recalled one fight from the old days when a fan stormed the stage and took a swing at the guitar player. The incident started a brawl on stage, and the band was run out of town.

Another time, Bellamy was hit in the face by a beer bottle that was thrown at him. Two of his teeth were chipped in what was like a scene out of The Blues Brothers — Bellamy’s band was booked into a bar that didn’t like his style of music. Bar brawls and all-night benders are a thing of the past now that Bellamy has a family. His daughter cries in the background as he does a phone interview for the Leader-Post from his home in Nashville.

Bellamy is best known for his work with the country band, the Road Hammers, but while in Regina Bellamy will be performing some of his own rock songs.

“I basically wrote them over the last five years while I’ve been with the Road Hammers,” said Bellamy. “It’s just my desire as an artist to create some fresh songs.”

Bellamy recorded the songs with help from a few of his friends in the music industry, such as Gordie Johnson from Big Sugar.

The solo project is influenced by a number of rock and roll artists from the Rolling Stones to the Black Crowes. One of the songs, “Goodbye America,” is about the death of the American dream caused by the current financial state of the country.

“There’s so much struggle and distraction in the world today,” said Bellamy. “I deal with my underlying spiritual take on the way I see the world — a sort of hopefulness through it all.”

People can listen to Bellamy’s new songs on his website:www.claytonbellamyband.com

“I want my music to lift you up, and give you something to believe in. For me, the thing that always resonates is the message. I want to hear a story,” said Bellamy.

A self-described motor head, Bellamy got his start as a semi-pro motocross racer. He also played in a lot of small honky-tonk bands.

Bellamy, who grew up in Bonnyville, Alta., recorded his first solo album at the age of 24 and one day got a call out of the blue from Jason McCoy, inviting him to audition for the Road Hammers.

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